, ,

Transforming The African Public Service By Tunji Olaopa

Seller
5 out of 5

This volume is an attempt to consistently think through the reform of the public administration and public service dynamics that could serve as an institutional framework for reorienting Africa’s postcolonial predicament. Africa has often been regarded, among other uncomplimentary epithets, as the most difficult administrative contexts in the world. The failure of the public service in Africa is essentially the failure of the democratic experiment in Africa. The ten lectures gathered in this significant volume derive from the author’s practical and intellectual involvement with public administration thinking on the continent including the articulation of the African Public Service Charter under the auspices of the African Union Commission. The essays are all united by a firm conviction that once the public/civil service in Africa fails, then all else has failed in terms of an infrastructural transformation of Africa that will make democratic governance a meaningful experiment for Africans. The volume therefore delivers a serious trajectory of how the African public service and administrative dynamics can leverage on global best practices and existing reform ideas to undermine the African predicament and install good governance for Africans. “…there is no one better positioned to take up the urgent task of fashioning the philosophical and intellectual enterprise crucial to the re-alignment of public service in Africa, which he superbly demonstrates throughout the pages of this book…” Toyin Falola, Jacob & Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities, The University of Texas at Austin

Item will be shipped in 1-2 weeks

$9.98

Based on 0 reviews

0.0 overall
0
0
0
0
0

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

There are no reviews yet.

No more offers for this product!

General Inquiries

There are no inquiries yet.

You may also like…

  • , ,

    The interpreters By Wole Soyinka

    0 out of 5
    (0)

    The interpreters, written by Wole Soyinka in 1965, divided into two parts, is a social realism which major theme centres on the post-independence moral decadence that plagues the Nigerian society, up-till date, attempted to be solved by the Nigerians who had just returned from studies abroad. Each of the main characters is engaged in the enterprise of interpreting himself in relation to the society in which he lives, in an attempt to discover the right way to live. The narrative is, as a result, multi-stranded and employs a shifting, subjective time-scale, and in some aspects, the narrative situation used is figural, sometimes resulting in flashbacks; rendered with an intense use of language somewhat complex and metaphorical. The novel has its settings in Lagos and University of Ibadan. There is a range of character types in The Interpreters in that each of the main personae has an individual way of interpreting the world, though of course, due to their association with each other, there is a degree of commonality in some respects, both in the sense of shared experience and of quality of experience as intellectuals, though with some exceptions. However, their interpretations tilted towards the same thought stemming from shared experiences as intellectuals, except Kola. They bear the burden of the author’s worries and emphasis on indecision. They collectively and helplessly search for self-identity as a way out of the identity crisis and lack of moral stance.

    SKU: n/a
  • , ,

    America Gives, and America Takes: Alien Cultures and Judicial Systems in Focus By George C. Udeozor

    0 out of 5
    (0)

    America Gives . . . . And America Takes . . . . is as much a story about the highs and lows of one man’s American Dreams as those of countless others who fled their countries of origin to pursue the promise they were certain to achieve in America. As the author finds out, because of unforeseen cultural conflicts, not all American Dreams which become reality may remain so for long. This book is non-fiction based on the life of the author and the actual events that took place to the best of the author’s memory and perception as they happened. The author’s account are based on his views, ideals, opinions, and understanding of those events and the people involved. Any reference to persons, agencies, governments, or any entity is the opinion of the author pertaining to the events which took place as they relate to him. The book provides no definitive statement or conclusion as to the character and intentions of each individual or entity mentioned in the book. The readers may make their own determination and opinion based on the information provided, as well as obtaining additional information concerning the facts, from their own further investigation.

    SKU: n/a
  • , ,

    After Mandela: The Battle for the Soul of South Africa By Alec Russell

    0 out of 5
    (0)

    When Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress declared victory over the bitter injustice of apartheid, some thought South Africa’s future was assured. But despite Mandela’s mission of reconciliation, rampant inequality remains; race relations are uneasy, violence is endemic and many in the ANC appear to have lost sight of the liberation ideals. With the election in 2009 of Jacob Zuma, a charismatic populist embroiled in scandal, uncertainty over the trajectory of the nation has only intensified.

    South Africa now stands at a crossroads, and award-winning journalist Alec Russell draws on his deep knowledge of the country to tell us how it got there and to give us a compelling account, revised and updated for this edition, of the journey from Mandela to Zuma.

    SKU: n/a